COFFEE FROM ACROSS THE GLOBE

COFFEE FROM ACROSS THE GLOBE

Fresh Coffee on Repeat

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Photo by Karl Fredrickson

New Delhi Blend

New Delhi Blend

Lively and bold coffee inspired by India's historic city

Image: Trekkerpedia

IndiaRise Blend

IndiaRise Blend

Grown in the vast hills of Baba Budan, Chickmaguluru, India

Image: Trekkerpedia

MOCHA AL-YEMEN

Mocha Al-Yemen

Our signature roasted coffee beans, grown in the high-altitude terraces of Yemen.

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Kickstart your soul.

 

 

Coffee Sheikh’s Mission

Coffee Sheikh is a new Eastern fusion coffee brand, aiming to introduce cultural elements from all over the globe to the United States coffee scene. We are reaching out to farmers and roasters throughout the world, from India to Kenya to Yemen, who have hundreds of years of experience harvesting coffee and brewing it with traditional techniques. We guarantee that the coffee we get from them is authentic, and roasted to perfection. These award-winning coffees we are going after are highly sought, and often very difficult to find. By overcoming the geographic and language barrier, Coffee Sheikh guarantees to ship quality to your doorstep.

More Than Just Coffee

Coffee Sheikh aims to use coffee as a vehicle for Eastern fusion art, music, and fashion to reach mainstream America. Reach out to us at [email protected] to discuss how we can help promote your brand. 

 

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turkish coffee
Some days are especially long. Turkish-style coffee can give you that extra kick you need in the morning or evening when nothing else is doing it for you. This blog post is to teach people: 1) What is Turkish coffee? 2) How do you make it, featuring a how-to video from a real Turkish PhD student 1) What is Turkish coffee? Obviously it must be from Turkey right? Wrong. Turkey doesn’t really grow coffee. The word “Turkish” is a reference to the Ottoman empire, which championed control over a majority of the Middle East beginning around the 1400s. Legend has it that the Turkish governor of Yemen, Ozdemir Pasha, discovered that coffee was being grown and shared it with Suleiman the Magnificent, the sultan at the time. Being early innovators, the Sultan’s staff made a new way of preparing the coffee by grinding the coffee very, very finely, and brewed the coffee inside a pot called an Ibrik. An image of a traditional Ebrik. https://www.imj.org.il/en/collections/511760. So, the term ‘Turkish coffee’ actually refers to the grinding style and brewing process. However, Turkish coffee was actually grown in modern-day Yemen! How confusing! This is a problem, because now many people get confused and don’t realize what they are drinking. If you go to the Middle Eastern supermarket store, you get Turkish-style coffees that are from Brazil! These coffees are much cheaper, and more bitter, leaving a false impression that Turkish coffee is a very bitter drink. Yemen’s unique arid climate, however, leads
This summer, I had the wonderful opportunity to visit Michigan during a work trip. As usual, I couldn’t resist trying out all the coffee shops I could set my eyes on. As old-fashioned and labor-intensive as it sounds, going and visiting the stores in person and speaking to the owners and staff has consistently been a worthwhile experience to me. Generally, the coffee industry in the United States is very open to sharing knowledge and quite frankly, visiting coffee shops can also sometimes be the best way to meet people and make new friends in the business. My first stop in my work trip was in the Detroit area which was especially interesting to me considering Detroit’s popular view as an old and abandoned city. It was my first trip to the area, and I was surprised to learn Detroit’s close proximity to Canada which happened to be where my Airbnb was situated. I stayed in a small city in Canada called Windsor, which could be accessed from Detroit by a very unsuspecting tunnel bus that takes you to the immigration checkpoint. Windsor appeared to me the type of city where everyone seemed to know each other. It was actually in this tiny area where I found my first gem of a coffee shop called The Coffee Exchange. It was a nice small shop where you might go to catch up with family members during a lazy weekend and hopefully see a familiar face or two. What really swept me
Just earlier this week, President Trump vetoed a congress resolution to end military sales to Saudi Arabia for warfare against Yemen. If the veto is not overturned by congress, the United States will continue to contribute to what is being called the world’s worst humanitarian crisis to-date. Notable politicians, such as Senator Bernie Sanders, have thankfully begun to focus on these issues to educate the public and end the war in Yemen. However, Saudi Arabia’s devastating warfare was supported by the United States government under most Americans’ noses since 2004. And the delayed attention received by the public is by no means the first time United States involvement in the Middle East has been ignored. Afghanistan, Iraq, and Syria are only the most obvious examples.  There are numerous possible explanations for why there is such little reaction for issues in the Middle East. Mainly, it might be due to poor success regarding cultural assimilation. It could be as simple as a lack of something tangible to gain a glimpse into foreign culture. When we see things, use things, or speak to certain people everyday, these experiences become embedded into our memory and we become more emotionally invested in those events which are connected to our experiences. Sure, in large cities, there are large diverse groups of people who meet each other every day for work or school, and different cultures are intertwined. However, rural America is not exposed to the same cultural influences, and may not be for a long